Monthly ArchiveFebruary 2019

An announcement by Alibaba Pictures said the Beijing

based company decided to invest in Green Book in July, as the decision-maker

were attracted by its heartwarming theme, positive values and quality narrative.

Following the decision, the Paper said, Alibaba Pictures recommended the film to Hu

axia Film Distribution, and both sides agreed to introduce Green Book to Chinese audience.

Only four days after the film was announced, Chinese audience could watch it in the nearby theaters. Yu said af

ter watching Green Book on Monday that the cooperation between Alibaba Pictures and Huaxia Film Distribution m

akes the fastest release in China for an imported movie, which is also attributed to the country’s reform and opening-up.

As of the publication time, Alibaba Pictures shares increased 1.39 percent to HK$1.46 on Tuesday in Hong Kong.

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Premier financial magazine bullish on Chinese stocks market

Chinese stocks market surged on Monday with benchmark indices in Shanghai and Shenzhen jumping over 5 percent, mak

ing daily turnover break through 1.04 trillion yuan ($155.5 billion), a new record since 2015. The Barron’s, a fin

ancial weekly published by Dow Jones & Company, said the performance of Chinese stocks is much better than the S&

P 500. Global investment management corporation BlackRock also suggested lasting gains of the bull market.

Barron’s said the CSI 300 index, which tracks the largest stocks traded in the Shanghai and Shenzhen

stock exchanges, rose 6 percent on Monday, with a year-to-date gain of nearly 24 percent, twice the gai

n in the S&P 500, making the CSI 300 index one of the best performing indices globally in 2019.

The ongoing finance sector reforms and further industry open-up could also help boost the Chinese economy and the stock market, the Barron’s report said.

China’s financial system has great potential in helping stabilize the economy, a previous China Daily report said, adding that the co

untry will deepen supply-side structural reform in the financial sector and strengthen the sector’s ability to serve the real economy.

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Trump could try to sell North Korea a Vietnam model. But

The night before his historic summit with US President Donald Trump last June, North Kore

an leader Kim Jong Un took a surprise stroll in downtown Singapore to see the sights of the wealthy capitalist city.

The inference seemed clear. If cash-strapped Pyongyang chooses to engage the world — and ditch its nuclear weapons — this could be its future.

Trump and Kim will this month have an even more symbolic backdrop for their next mee

ting: Vietnam, a country which transformed itself from bitter US enemy to peaceful partner in less than 50 years.

Experts believe the Trump administration plans to sell North Korea on a model such as communist Vietnam, hig

hlighting its relationship with Washington as well as its economic boom since adopting market reforms. And all th

e North Koreans have to do, Washington is expected to say, is give up their nukes.

Yet analysts are wary such a sales pitch will produce any tangible outcome. North Korea

knows how capitalism and market economies work: it’s just chosen not to embrace them.

China has for years been prodding the North to embrace economic reform, dragging for

mer North Korean leader Kim Jong Il on tours of capitalist enterprises whenever he visited.

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The problem with this message is simpledead peop

  need money.”Lankov is one of the few foreigners ever to study at Kim Il Sung University, the country’s most pr

estigious institution of higher learning. Today he runs the Korea Risk Group consultancy, teaches at Kookmin Uni

versity in Seoul and is considered one of the world’s experts on the inner workings of North Korea.

  He says Kim and his top advisers are cold, realistic and brutally rational. They believe that nuclear weapons are the key to their survival given the fate of Moa

mmar Gaddafi, Saddam Hussein and Ukraine as well as Trump’s decision to ditch the Iran nuclear deal.

  ”For the North Koreans, security comes first. And they believe that their security is imperfect if they don’t have some

nuclear weapons. A reduction of nuclear weapons can be negotiated, but denuclearization is a pipe dream,” Lankov said.

  Jackson, the former Defense Department official, is also unconvinced that Kim Jong Un is the reformer many hoped he would be.

  Though Kim is a millennial leader educated in the West, he has n

ow been in power for seven years — during which time he’s overseen more missile and nu

clear tests than his father and grandfather combined, without “meaningful signs” of economic change.

  ”What is different now than the previous 30 years that makes that control-versus-opening tradeoff worthwhile?” Jackson said.

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So the fact that the to-and-fro is still in progress this far

down the line highlight that there is a shared desire to secure an accord that delivers on the rapport that has been established — also perhaps beyond both side’s expectations.

But it would be getting ahead of the situation to consider the final push tow

ard a consensus on principled, mutually beneficial cooperation all done and

dusted. That consensus, which President Xi identified as the objectiv

e of the talks when he met with the US negotiators after the previous round of neg

otiations in Beijing, has still not been completed, and probably will not be until the two leaders meet to agree on the final det

ails. But there is no doubt that both sides are aware of how momentous such a consensus would be, beyond the tangible rewards it would offer both cou

ntries. For if the two sides can iron out their core differences by abiding by the principles of mutual respect and m

utual benefit, it would reset their relationship in a way that would bode well for the future.

History in the past four decades shows that the two countries benefit in an all-around wa

y from harmonious trade and economic relations, as they provide the ballast for their relationship.

There is obviously still more work to be done. However, if neither side puts a foot wrong, a deal will finally be signed sooner or later.

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DPRK leader leaves Pyongyang for Hanoi for second DPRK

PYONGYANG — Kim Jong-un, top leader of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), left here Saturday afternoon by train f

or Vietnamese capital Hanoi for the second DPRK-US summit, the official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported Sunday.

Kim will meet with US President Donald Trump there on Feb 27-28. Their first meetin

g was held in June 2018 in Singapore, which resulted in improved bilateral relations.

Kim will pay an official visit to Vietnam at the invitation of Vietnamese President Nguyen Phu Trong before his meeting with Trump.

Kim was accompanied by Kim Yong-chol, Ri Su-yong, Kim Phyong-hae and O Su-yong, members of th

e Political Bureau and vice-chairmen of the Central Committee of the Workers’ Party of K

orea (WPK), Ri Yong-ho, member of the Political Bureau of the WPK Central Com

mittee and foreign minister, No Kwang-chol, alternate member of the Po

litical Bureau of the WPK Central Committee and minister of the People’s Armed Forces, among others, said the KCNA.

Kim was seen off at Pyongyang Railway Station by Kim Yong-nam, Choe Ryong-hae and Pak Pong-ju, members of the Presidium of the Political Bureau of the Cen

tral Committee of the WPK, and other senior officials of the party, government and armed forces, said the KCNA.

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Flight inspections at new Beijing airport complete ddays early

  Beijing’s new international airport finished its flight inspections on Sunday, 19 days ahead of schedule, according to the civil aviation authority.

  At 10:20 am, an aircraft taking off from Beijing Capital Internation

al Airport in the northeastern part of the city landed smoothly on the northern run

way at Beijing Daxing International Airport. The Civil Aviation Administration’s North China Regional Bu

reau called the event a “successful completion” in a news release, referring to its series of flight inspections.

  The inspections, which lasted for 34 days, started on Jan 22 and were suppo

sed last until March 15 to cover the airport’s four runways, six landing systems, lighting facilities and other services.

  Flight inspections, which all airports must undergo before opening, are designed to ensure the airport’s flight pro

cedures and aviation navigational aids will be ready for operation, according to the news release.

  Daxing airport is scheduled to be completed by June 30 and enter commercial operation before Sept 30.

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However, a one-hour extension is less time than many

  voters have spent in line to cast their ballots in the crucial election.

  The incumbent, Muhammadu Buhari, 76, is running against 71 other ca

ndidates, but his main challenger is Atiku Abubakar, a 72-year-old business tycoo

n and former vice president. They are both Muslim candidates from the north of the country.

  When Buhari, a former military ruler, was elected in 2015, it wa

s the first peaceful transition of power in Nigeria. He promised to offer a clean sweep of the old

routine, but many have been left disillusioned and angry at the rising levels of inequality and extreme poverty.

  More than 84 million people registered for the vote in Africa’s largest economic p

ower, according to data from the Independent National Electoral Commission.

  Videos have surfaced on social media reportedly showing the burni

ng of ballot papers and disruption of the electoral process in various parts of the country.

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Iranians are paying for US sanctions with their health

  Ali only had two hours to save his baby’s life. He careened through traffic and sped along highway

s to an east Tehran government pharmacy. When he saw some 800 people queued outside the fac

ility, he dropped to his knees. Like him, they were waiting to obtain state-funded medications.

  ”I cried and screamed, begging people to let me get through,” Ali — whom we have not fully identified for security reasons — recalls.

  Eventually, he skipped the line and returned with the medicine in time for his one-year-old daughter, Dory, to recover.The incid

ent happened just as Iran’s landmark nuclear deal with six world powers led by the US was being sig

ned in 2015. It was a moment when Iranian President Hassan Rouhani had promised Iranians an easier life, free of me

dicinal and food shortages, and where desperate scenes such as Ali’s outside the pharmacy would become a thing of the past.

  Iran was halting its nuclear program in exchange for international sanctions relief, appearing to turn the pa

ge on a 36-year history of diplomatic and economic

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In Iran’s ski resorts, for instance, signs admonish female

  to “obey Islamic affairs,” but many swap their headscarves for ski hats. The morality police

who for years were said to chase transgressors down the slopes on skis, have a dwindling presence in these areas.

  The penalty for breaking hijab rules is also being reduced, with fines of around $15 becoming more common than arrests.

  For commentators and activists, the incident in Tehran may be a sign of more acts of rebellion against the morality police to come.

  ”Iranians are very angry with morality police these days,” tweeted Masih Alineja

d, the Iranian activist behind the “White Wednesday” social media campaign against mandatory hijabs.

  Update: This article has been updated to remove a tweet containing images that CNN c

ould not independently verify. This is a developing story and will continue to be updated.

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